Roger Bothwell | Beautiful People
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Beautiful People

I stopped at a Burger King yesterday (They have a great vegeburger.) and couldn’t miss a really big mural on the wall of five young, very handsome, beautiful and multiracial people all laughing and smiling as they were enjoying their fries and burgers.   Does something like that ever happen?   I looked around the room to notice a few ordinary looking people like me. (I’m being generous with myself.) 
 
It’s the same with commercials on television.  They are always populated with happy beautiful people. The casino ads are the worst.  They picture gorgeous people laughing as they rake in their imaginary jackpots.  Shampoo ads have women with silky, radiant hair being tossed about in the wind.  Where do they find these people?  I guess there really are Jennifer Anistons in the world but they don’t eat at my Burger King.
 
Isn’t it great that the first four books in the New Testament are called The Gospels – The Good News?  Here it is in a nutshell.  It is such good news.  God loves ordinary looking people. Heaven is going to be populated with ordinary looking people.  Of course we will all be beautiful there but that will be the norm.  Hooray. He even loves people who don’t quite measure up to ordinary and they too will be part of heaven’s norm.
 
Statistically the norm is two standard deviations on either side of the mean which means about 95 % of the population looks okay.  2.5% looks terrific and the other 2.5% we hope have beautiful personalities.   So the next time you look in the mirror remind yourself that God loves you with your big nose, crooked ears, baggy eyes and balding head.  So how in heaven will we ever get a distribution when everyone is part of the upper 2.5%?