In Praise of Procrastination
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In Praise of Procrastination

I would like to sing the praises of procrastination.  The wind prevails from the west so the street gutter in front of my house has over filled with maple and oak leaves.  Just last evening I finally said to myself that when I awaken in the morning I would rouse myself to action against the forces of nature and clean the gutter; after all it is December 8.  I should not have waited so long.  Now comes the good part.  Early this morning as I was coming down the stairs toward the kitchen I heard what sounded like a heavy truck out front.  Lo and behold it was the city cleaning my gutter.  My tax dollars at work!  What would have taken me at least two hours or more and a possible heart attack because of lugging the leaves away was done in less than five minutes and my heart is still intact!
 
My neighbors had cleaned their gutters with much blowing and lugging away.   My gutter was cleaned by persistent patience.  I am feeling a bit smug.  I am about ready to adopt a new ethic.  “What does not have to be done today can wait until tomorrow.”
 
As grand as this sounds, (to some) it really doesn’t work when thinking about eternal life.  Paul said it so well in II Corinthians, “This is the day of salvation.”  There are two reasons for this.  Number one is we have no guarantee there will be a tomorrow for us.  And secondly, why would we want to live a lesser quality of life?  Making Jesus our Lord and Savior makes life so much better.  It reduces stress, it takes away our worries and concerns about the future.  And it also helps make us better people.  Why wait?  Don’t wait.  Procrastination is only good for raking leaves.