Stephen Hopkins
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Stephen Hopkins

30One of the great moments in American history occurred when Stephen Hopkins, the delegate from Rhode Island, signed the Declaration of Independence. His signature was very shaky because he suffered from palsy. When he finished signing he said, “My hand trembles, but my heart does not.” He had just taken a pledge of his “sacred honor.” This nation was founded by “real” men.

When we look at the cross, when we see the brutally mangled body of our Savior, when we realize He could have given up at any second, when we realize we get to live forever because of His love, can we do less than pledge our sacred honor to our heavenly Father and His Son? If Stephen Hopkins could so commit to the concept of a new kind of nation on earth, can we not so commit without trembling of heart to the idea of a universe without sin governed by its creator?

If you have an extra minute right now, please read II Corinthians 11. It is a chronicle of Paul’s beatings, shipwrecks, stonings and snake bite. He was an amazing super hero who knew his power was not in himself but in the one to whom he had committed his sacred honor. He wrote in II Timothy 1:12, “I am not ashamed. For I know whom I have believed, and am persuaded that He is able to keep that which I have committed unto Him against that Day.” Paul’s heart never trembled.